Stamping. It’s that glorious and mysterious world which has so many possibilities. Did you know that you can do stamping with bleach? Erica Bass shows us how to use this unique technique in today’s terriffic tutorial.

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I love experimenting with all the different things that you can do with some rubber stamps and ink. Stamping with bleach is one of my favorites. You get a lot of impact with very little effort.

A few supplies you will need:

  • A non reactive tray (ie paper plate, or small plastic plate will do)
  • Chlorine Bleach
  • one piece of paper towel folded
  • bold image rubber stamp
  • water based ink
  • brayer

First you will need to ink up your brayer on the ink pad by rolling the brayer on the pad until the whole roller is loaded with ink.

Next brayer your background color onto a piece of white card stock. Keep adding ink until you get the desired effect. (You can also sponge ink onto your paper if you don’t have a brayer.)

The next step will be to have some sort of non-reactive tray with a folded paper towel to make a little bleach puddle on. Make sure to work in a well-ventilated area and protect your surfaces and your clothes. You’ll need enough bleach on the paper towel to be damp without being dripping wet. Choose a bold stamp, very few fine lines that could cause the bleach to bleed too much when you stamp with it. When you stamp your image on the paper it removes the ink that was brayered on.  After you are done stamping remember to rinse your stamp with water then clean it with a conditioning spray.

Here is a close up on one of the places I stamped. What I love is the color variations you get from the chemical reaction. The ink surrounding the image changes a little bit turns a little more blue. FYI: after the bleach dries it becomes inert so it won’t damage your scrapbook pages over time. Just make sure you let it dry completely before placing anything else on your page. The drying process can be sped up with a heat gun at least ten inches away from the page so it doesn’t get too hot.

Here is an example of too much bleach (too wet).

Here is an example of not enough bleach (too dry).

And finally here are some examples I made with this technique:

Thanks for letting me share this technique! I hope some of you go try it!

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Erica, thank you so much for teaching us this unique technique! I love knowing that I can multi task my cleaning supplies  into my crafty world.

If you have an idea that you would like to see featured for a How To’sday tutorial, please don’t hesitate to share. You can send your photos and instructions to kristy@stealnetwork.com.

Have a great day and be sure to check in tomorrow for our next Mid Week Mojo installment, this time brought to you by one pretty incredible guest sketcher!